Apple has agreed to let developers of iPhone apps email their users about cheaper ways to pay for digital subscriptions and media by circumventing a commission system that generates billions of dollars annually for the iPhone maker.
The concession announced late Thursday, which covers emailed notifications but does not allow in-app notifications, is part of a preliminary settlement of a nearly 2-year-old lawsuit filed on behalf of iPhone app developers in the U.S. It also addresses an issue raised by a federal court judge who is expected to soon rule on a separate case brought by Epic Games, maker of the popular video game Fortnite.
Apple also will set up a USD 100 million fund that will pay thousands of app developers covered in the lawsuit sums ranging from USD 250 to USD 30,000. App developers will get more flexibility to set different prices within their apps, expanding the options from about 100 to 500 choices.
Under long-standing Apple rules, makers of iPhone apps were forbiddApple has agreed to let developers of iPhone apps email their users about cheaper ways to pay for digital subscriptions and media by circumventing a commission system that generates billions of dollars annually for the iPhone maker.
The concession announced late Thursday, which covers emailed notifications but does not allow in-app notifications, is part of a preliminary settlement of a nearly 2-year-old lawsuit filed on behalf of iPhone app developers in the U.S. It also addresses an issue raised by a federal court judge who is expected to soon rule on a separate case brought by Epic Games, maker of the popular video game Fortnite.
Apple also will set up a USD 100 million fund that will pay thousands of app developers covered in the lawsuit sums ranging from USD 250 to USD 30,000. App developers will get more flexibility to set different prices within their apps, expanding the options from about 100 to 500 choices.
Under long-standing Apple rules, makers of iPhone apps were forbiddRead More